A Global Affair

Connecting and changing the world

4:48 PM
February 13th, 2013
By the end of next year our war in Afghanistan will be over

President Obama, State of the Union Address, February 12, 2013

Read the debate over how to handle the transition.

Afghan Endgame

(via foreignaffairsmagazine)

4:47 PM
February 13th, 2013



(Source: thesmithian)

6:00 PM
May 9th, 2012



2:06 PM
May 9th, 2012
some things don’t change


some things don’t change

2:05 PM
May 9th, 2012
disismaiblog:

5 years in France: After Mr Sarkozy it’s now your turn, Mr Hollande! Best of luck!


disismaiblog:

5 years in France: After Mr Sarkozy it’s now your turn, Mr Hollande! Best of luck!

2:05 PM
May 9th, 2012
jerrybuttles:

French Election #paris #election #hollande #sarkozy #american #rebel8 (Taken with Instagram at Place de la Bastille)


jerrybuttles:

French Election #paris #election #hollande #sarkozy #american #rebel8 (Taken with Instagram at Place de la Bastille)

2:02 PM
May 9th, 2012



(Source: art-is-boring)

2:00 PM
May 9th, 2012

Ninety-six years ago, when President Woodrow Wilson ran for re-election, two notable things happened: 1) His campaign used the slogan “He kept us out of war,” and 2) he won.

It has been a long time since any president could seek a second term while making that boast. Looking at recent history, you would conclude not that the Constitution allows the president to make war, but that it requires him to do so. Modern leaders don’t brag about keeping us out of war but about getting us in.

1:57 PM
May 9th, 2012



(Source: mirandaelizbeth)

1:50 PM
May 9th, 2012



1:49 PM
May 9th, 2012



1:48 PM
May 9th, 2012
fotojournalismus:

A boy cries as he holds his sister in his lap after a confrontation between squatters and police in Kathmandu, Nepal, May 8, 2012. Riot police in Katmandu arrested more than 20 protesters on Tuesday during clashes sparked by an attempt to evict landless squatters from their homes. Dozens were injured. The demolition drive follows a Nepali government decision to force the squatters out from an area beside the Thapathali hospital and move them to an alternative settlement along with the introduction of a property ownership document, according to local media reports.
[Credit : Bikash Dware / Reuters]


fotojournalismus:

A boy cries as he holds his sister in his lap after a confrontation between squatters and police in Kathmandu, Nepal, May 8, 2012. Riot police in Katmandu arrested more than 20 protesters on Tuesday during clashes sparked by an attempt to evict landless squatters from their homes. Dozens were injured. The demolition drive follows a Nepali government decision to force the squatters out from an area beside the Thapathali hospital and move them to an alternative settlement along with the introduction of a property ownership document, according to local media reports.

[Credit : Bikash Dware / Reuters]

(via onedirectionfacingmecca)

1:46 PM
May 9th, 2012
comedycentral:

RIP Maurice Sendak
As you may have already heard, the world is a lot worse off this morning. Maurice Sendak, the one-of-a-kind author of Where the Wild Things Are and In the Night Kitchen, has died at age 83.
One of his last of countless great contributions was the unforgettable interview he gave to Stephen Colbert earlier this year. Hilarious and genuine, it was Sendak at his zero-bullshit purest.
If anybody needs me, I’ll be watching it in my private boat in and out of weeks and almost over year.


comedycentral:

RIP Maurice Sendak

As you may have already heard, the world is a lot worse off this morning. Maurice Sendak, the one-of-a-kind author of Where the Wild Things Are and In the Night Kitchen, has died at age 83.

One of his last of countless great contributions was the unforgettable interview he gave to Stephen Colbert earlier this year. Hilarious and genuine, it was Sendak at his zero-bullshit purest.

If anybody needs me, I’ll be watching it in my private boat in and out of weeks and almost over year.

(via onedirectionfacingmecca)

1:45 PM
May 9th, 2012
npr:

My father, world-renowned virtuoso violinist and teacher Roman Totenberg, whose professional career spanned nine decades and four continents, died early Tuesday morning at the age of 101.
His death was as remarkable as his life. He made his debut as a soloist with the Warsaw Philharmonic at age 11, performed his last concert when he was in his mid-90s, and was still teaching, literally, on his deathbed. This week, as word flew around the musical world that he was in renal failure, former students flocked to his home in Newton, Mass., to see the beloved “maestro.”
Mainly, he wanted to hear them play, and several of the sessions turned into long lessons, with my father, eyes closed, conducting with one hand to keep the tempo, slowing the phrasing here and there, and at one point, asking Daniel Han, now a member of the Philadelphia Orchestra, to hand over his violin so my dad could show him some fingering.
Letitia Hom, who has a class of students of her own now, wanted a lesson on the Brahms violin concerto, so on Saturday, she stood at his bedside playing beautifully for him. At one stopping point, though, he spoke so softly, she had to bend her ear to his lips. His words: “The D was flat.”
Solo violinist Mira Wang, who came from China decades ago to study with him, played for hours on Sunday. Every time she would stop, he had just one word: “More.” And still they came, one after another, describing how he had changed their lives. So widespread was the outpouring, that one former student in Poland had to be dissuaded from jumping on a plane to the United States.
He was a caring and wise father not just to us, his three daughters, but to literally thousands of students around the world who had studied with him. I dare say there is not a major orchestra in Europe or the U.S. that does not have at least one student who studied with him. When Wang, who is 40-something with a husband and two children of her own, left our house on Sunday, she said to my brother-in-law Ralph, “Now, I finally have to be a grown-up.”
(via Roman Totenberg’s Remarkable Life And Death by Nina Totenberg)
Photo courtesy of Nina Totenberg


npr:

My father, world-renowned virtuoso violinist and teacher Roman Totenberg, whose professional career spanned nine decades and four continents, died early Tuesday morning at the age of 101.

His death was as remarkable as his life. He made his debut as a soloist with the Warsaw Philharmonic at age 11, performed his last concert when he was in his mid-90s, and was still teaching, literally, on his deathbed. This week, as word flew around the musical world that he was in renal failure, former students flocked to his home in Newton, Mass., to see the beloved “maestro.”

Mainly, he wanted to hear them play, and several of the sessions turned into long lessons, with my father, eyes closed, conducting with one hand to keep the tempo, slowing the phrasing here and there, and at one point, asking Daniel Han, now a member of the Philadelphia Orchestra, to hand over his violin so my dad could show him some fingering.

Letitia Hom, who has a class of students of her own now, wanted a lesson on the Brahms violin concerto, so on Saturday, she stood at his bedside playing beautifully for him. At one stopping point, though, he spoke so softly, she had to bend her ear to his lips. His words: “The D was flat.”

Solo violinist Mira Wang, who came from China decades ago to study with him, played for hours on Sunday. Every time she would stop, he had just one word: “More.” And still they came, one after another, describing how he had changed their lives. So widespread was the outpouring, that one former student in Poland had to be dissuaded from jumping on a plane to the United States.

He was a caring and wise father not just to us, his three daughters, but to literally thousands of students around the world who had studied with him. I dare say there is not a major orchestra in Europe or the U.S. that does not have at least one student who studied with him. When Wang, who is 40-something with a husband and two children of her own, left our house on Sunday, she said to my brother-in-law Ralph, “Now, I finally have to be a grown-up.”

(via Roman Totenberg’s Remarkable Life And Death by Nina Totenberg)

Photo courtesy of Nina Totenberg

1:43 PM
May 9th, 2012
(In a conference on the GWOT, 9/11 and "Islamic ideology", I was in the speaking panel)
Young British man in the crowd asks me: Are you apologetic about 9/11?
Me: No. I don't apologize for 9/11. Why should I? I had nothing to do with it. I'm only sorry about the lives lost - regardless of who they were. But I am NOT a spokesperson for Al-Qaeda. No sensible Muslim is. Do I ask British people to apologize to me for colonizing my country back then, taking the rights of the masses away, ending freedom of speech, creating problematic borders that led to bloodshed, sexually assaulting the women of my land, westernizing the entire pedagogues in the subcontinent, turning my culture and my identity into a mystical subject for orientalist authors to go capitalize on? Have I asked you to say sorry to me?
Him: (remains silent)